Doc And Connie Prepare For Flight

Doc, the B-29 restoration project that was forced outside over the winter due to a lack of hangar space in Wichita, now is back under a roof, Josh Wells, a member of Doc’s Friends, told AVweb this week. “Last week we were able to reach an agreement on a tentative plan for hangar space at the same location where we’ve been restoring the plane,” Wells said. Meanwhile, at Marana Regional Airport, near Tucson, Arizona, a team from Dynamic Aviation is preparing to fly Columbine II to their company headquarters in Bridgewater, Virginia, early next month.
Source: avwebDoc And Connie Prepare For Flight

Whiplash in Salem

What KSLE airspace will look like once the Final Rule become effective May 26, 2016. Image courtesy Charles West.

True cooperation is the key.

On May 1, 2015, the FAA posted a notice of proposed rule making (NPRM) in the Federal Register to expand Class D and E airspace around Salem, Oregon’s McNary Field (KLSE).

KSLE airspace prior to recent changes. Image courtesy Charles West.

KSLE airspace prior to recent changes. Image courtesy Charles West.

The summary of the NRPM states, “After a biennial review, the FAA found it necessary to amend the airspace area for the safety and management of Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) operations for Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) at the airport.”

The proposal section states, “The FAA has determined this proposed regulation only involves an established body of technical regulations for which frequent and routine amendments are necessary to keep them operationally current. Therefore, this proposed regulation (1) Is not a “significant regulatory action” under Executive Order 12866; (2) is not a “significant rule” under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; Feb. 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a regulatory evaluation as the anticipated impact is so minimal. Since this is a routine matter that will only affect air traffic procedures and air navigation, it is certified this proposed rule, when promulgated, would not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.”

No comments were made. As a result, the NPRM became final on Aug. 20, 2015.

KSLE airspace as of March 15, 2016. Image courtesy SkyVector.com.

KSLE airspace as of March 15, 2016. Image courtesy SkyVector.com.

Once the airspace modifications were fully understood by the local community, the uproar was swift and loud.

Fast forward

Just 33 days later, a new Sept. 21, 2015 NPRM summary states, “After further review, the FAA found some airspace unnecessary for Standard Instrument Approach Procedures for Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) operations at the airport.”

This particular NPRM elicited 71 comments.

March 8, 2016

On March 8, 2016, the FAA posted a Final Rule to the Federal Register regarding Salem airspace. Apparently, a good many Christmas tree farmers under the impacted airspace felt the NPRM would have a significant economic impact.

The FAA’s Discussion of Comments section begins with, “Of the 71 responses received, 19 concerned the potential economic impact to Christmas tree farms in the area. The FAA concurs that approximately two thirds of the Christmas tree farming acreage could be adversely affected. To mitigate the concerns for the agricultural areas, the FAA is creating shelves in the Class D, where feasible, between 4 and 5 miles southeast and southwest of the airport.”

Wait a minute — on May 1, 2015 the FAA’s NPRM stated, “this proposed rule, when promulgated, would not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities.” Huh…

The Final Rule’s summary also states, “This action brings the controlled airspace into compliance with current FAA requirements, and adds to the safety and management of IFR operations at the airport.”

But the original NPRM stated, “the FAA found it necessary to amend the airspace area for the safety and management of Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) operations for Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) at the airport.”

So the FAA intended to grab more airspace than “FAA requirements” with the May 1, 2015 NPRM. That’s unacceptable.

What KSLE airspace will look like once the Final Rule become effective May 26, 2016. Image courtesy Charles West.

KSLE Final Rule airspace on top of current airspace. The final rule will become effective May 26, 2016. Image courtesy Charles West.

This whole process has created much anguish. It is sad, really.

“Nineteen commenters referenced a lack of public input. The FAA conducted a review of the process and found that all public coordination was completed consistent with the process outlined in JO 7400.2.”

Good for you FAA staff. You complied — in your own judgment — with the letter of the law. And yet, for the third time in 12 months, Salem’s airspace will change.

I’ve no doubt airspace design is tough. The various aerospace groups want and need different things. For that reason alone, the FAA and the aviation community must work together.

If the FAA had honored not just the letter, but the spirit of Joint Order 7400.2 — which outlines public notice, among many other things — this mess could’ve been avoided.

Revitalizing General Aviation: The Future Part 23

The FAA thinks cooperation with industry is so important, it produced a video to crow about its efforts on the Part 23 re-write.

The voice over at the beginning says, “For us in the FAA, the critical work ahead is to engage cooperatively with aviation industry leaders to bring those innovative ideas and technologies to market quickly, safely, and under a fresh, forward-looking regulatory framework.”

Since the video has fewer than 1,000 views (as of this writing), I’m guessing most FAA staffers have yet to watch it.

I guess that means it is business as usual. That’s sad. It could be so much better.

Source: http://generalaviationnews.comWhiplash in Salem

New app updates focus on hardware connectivity

EFB app updates 2016

Another day, another iPad app update. It sure seems that way, right? We’re fortunate as pilots to have access to a portable avionics system like the iPad that continuously receives application updates with new features, capabilities and expanded hardware compatibility. You don’t have to look far to see the alternative–meaning the certified avionics in your panel–where it literally takes years for new software updates to be developed, tested and FAA approved.

Today we’re going to look at what’s new in the popular ForeFlight app, along with 2 other rapidly growing apps in the EFB app market, Aerovie Reports and FltPlan Go.

ForeFlight Mobile
  • Logbook photos–ForeFlight’s recent logbook addition has been a big hit with pilots, and it continues to gain functionality. You can now attach unlimited images—from your Photos app or fresh from your device’s camera—to flight entries, aircraft profiles, certificates, and endorsements. Use photos to capture the view on approach to the runway, keep a visual record of squawks, or take a selfie of you and your passengers. Once in Logbook, images can be cropped and rotated to your liking. As with all your Logbook data, these images are stored securely in the ForeFlight Cloud so you can access them from all of your devices.
  • FAA 8710 Reports–The logbook menu now includes a new Reports section, which includes the option to format your flight time into the standard FAA 8710 form. You can then email or print a PDF version of the report right from the app. This form is required be completed when applying for a new certificate or rating.
  • Logbook Qualifications–Medical and knowledge test certificates with issue and expiration dates can now be added in the Qualifications section, along with new custom type ratings.
  • Garmin GTX 345 Support–Garmin announced the new GTX 345 ADS-B In/Out transponder last month, which features the ability to send ADS-B weather and traffic right to compatible iPad apps. ForeFlight can now connect wirelessly to the transponder and use it as a source for ADS-B traffic and weather.
  • Avidyne Compatibility–ForeFlight can also now communicate directly with the Avidyne IFD540/440 FMS. The Avidyne’s built in WiFi sends GPS position data to ForeFlight and enables flight plan transfer from the GPS to Foreflight.

FF logbook photo

FltPlan Go
  • Procedures on Maps–This feature is available in most of the major EFB apps and is now an option in FltPlan Go. When on the moving map, tap the airport symbol, select View Procedures, and then select the name of the chart you’d like to overlay. A new button will appear on the right side of the screen labeled Plate Options, which allows you to then make changes or remove the chart overlay.
  • METAR view shortcuts–when a METAR on the maps screen, you now have the option to also view runway details or airport information with new shortcut buttons in the dialog box.
  • Dual XGPS 190 support–The attitude indicator in the split-screen flight instruments can now be driven by the AHRS in the Dual XGPS 190 ADS-B receiver.
  • Avidyne Compatibility–FltPlan Go also supports flight plan transfers between the Avidyne IFD540/440 and the app over WiFi.

Fltplan plates

Aerovie Reports
  • Synthetic Vision–This is becoming a must-have feature in EFB apps. Aerovie’s implementation includes the essentials, like vertical tapes for airspeed, altimeter and vertical speed, along with an HSI for navigation. The 3D terrain is color-coded based on relative altitude, and also includes depictions of towers and obstacles. Additionally it can display a “highway in the sky” visual glide path for approaches, runway locations and a digital readout of feet of runway remaining on the current runway based on your present position.
  • Layout updates–The vertical weather profile, checklists and terrain profile buttons were moved to the top right of the maps screen.

thumb_IMG_0364_1024

Source: Ipad appsNew app updates focus on hardware connectivity

Activities To Celebrate Women Of Aviation Worldwide Week Double In 2016

More Than 100 Events Tailored For Women Took Pace On Six Continents This Year More than 100 activities, twice as many as in 2015, unfolded in Africa, America, Europe, and Oceania during the 6th annual Women Of Aviation Worldwide Week, a global aviation awareness week for girls of any age, founded and managed by the Institute for Women Of Aviation Worldwide (iWOAW).
Source: aero newsActivities To Celebrate Women Of Aviation Worldwide Week Double In 2016

Another Short-Term Fix For FAA

Congress once again has delayed taking substantive action on FAA funding issues, as the House voted yesterday to extend the current FAA budget through mid-July. The FAA’s budget is due to expire on March 31. Competing proposals in the House and Senate have failed to gain enough support for passage, as lawmakers argue over whether air traffic control should be privatized. The Senate is expected to approve the four-month extension later this week.
Source: avwebAnother Short-Term Fix For FAA

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