Category Archives: News from the web

News from various sources around the web.

Biofuel Flight Stops in Dayton

 Ross McCurdy (center) with son Aedean and EAA member Betty Darst  On April 25, 2016, EEA member Ross McCurdy completed the first transcontinental flight using aviation biofuel in a certified light aircraft.  Flying 5000 nautical miles coast to coast on a 10 day round trip, Ross and his 12-year-old son Aeden, flew from Rhode Island to Santa Monica, California and back to Rhode Island. Ross, a high school science teacher accomplished this on his spring break. The flight began on April 16,
Source: aviation trailBiofuel Flight Stops in Dayton

WowWee Launches Gaming Drone, Lumi

Robotics manufacturer WowWee has launched a campaign for its ‘gaming drone’, Lumi. The drone comes complete with autonomous flight and obstacle avoidance, along with several game modes. The team at WowWee are opening up the Lumi platform to app developers, as they see huge potential for gamifying drones as a way to introduce younger children to the […]

The post WowWee Launches Gaming Drone, Lumi appeared first on DRONELIFE.

Source: Quadcopter/Drone newsWowWee Launches Gaming Drone, Lumi

Pilot Survives Crash Into Parked Airplane, Escapes Fire

A Zenith Zodiac 601 went out of control after landing and crashed into a parked Cessna 441 on Tuesday in California, catching on fire. The pilot escaped with burn injuries. KCRA in Sacramento reported that the pilot, 75, had touched down on the runway at Nevada County Air Park in Grass Valley, then veered into the ramp and struck the right side of the twin-engine Cessna.
Source: avwebPilot Survives Crash Into Parked Airplane, Escapes Fire

Largest high school flying club opens new hangar

Standing outside the Lakeland Aero Club’s soon-to-be open hangar are members Dane Busone, P.J. Ohsiek, Cate Rosenoff, Phillip Herrington, and President Mike Zidzunas.

The Lakeland Aero Club’s new hangar opened just in time to show it off to the crowds at this year’s SUN ‘n FUN.

Lakeland Aero Club President Mike Zidziunas (second from left) with club members Trevor Penix, Michael Jenkins, and Tyson Trentham.

Lakeland Aero Club President Mike Zidziunas (second from left) with club members Trevor Penix, Michael Jenkins, and Tyson Trentham.

The 12,500-square-foot facility has office space, restrooms, and will house six aircraft.

Mike Zidziunas, president of the Lakeland Aero Club, explained that the 50 members of the club, who range in age from 15 to 25, learn and solo in taildraggers owned by the club.

The members also restore aircraft, like the 1939 Taylorcraft they are currently working on. The club owns two Piper Cubs, two Taylorcrafts, a Cessna 150, a glider, and a two-seat Remos light-sport aircraft.

According to SUN ’n FUN President John “Lites” Leenhouts, the Lakeland Aero Club is “the largest high school flying club on the planet.”

Standing outside the Lakeland Aero Club’s soon-to-be open hangar are members Dane Busone, P.J. Ohsiek, Cate Rosenoff, Phillip Herrington, and President Mike Zidzunas.

Standing outside the Lakeland Aero Club’s hangar a few days before SUN ‘n FUN kicked were Dane Busone, P.J. Ohsiek, Cate Rosenoff, Phillip Herrington, and President Mike Zidziunas.

Zidziunas said he is driven to bring young students into aviation because “there is a two-generation gap between students and instructors. Who’s going attract and teach high-school age pilots?”

“The secret to my success is that I never grew up,” he continued. “I tell them, ‘Don’t let someone tell you that you can’t do something. Be persistent. Try until they throw you out. When you’re young you can ask for outrageous things. The worse that can happen is they’ll say no. Sometimes they’ll say yes.’”

“We have taken 23 students to Oshkosh over the last three years,” he noted. “Donovan Richards, for example, did his dual long cross-country to Oshkosh in 2013.”

Last year, club member Phillip Herrington produced a YouTube video of his demonstration flight at Oshkosh in the Super Cub that Zidziunas says made him a celebrity with young girls at Oshkosh. See the video on YouTube.

Herrington, who graduated from Central Florida Aerospace Academy in 2013, now flies a commuter Embraer for Via Airlines out of Maitland, Florida. He continues as a member of the Lakeland Aero Club.

In addition to flight training and aircraft restoration, the club participated in the April 16 airshow in Freeport, Bahamas, and a Young Eagles event in cooperation with Western Air.

“If you make it all about them, you get pulled along to new places,” Zidziunas said. “And you get to enjoy them discovering new places. On the way to Oshkosh they had to fly over mountains. They’ve never flown over mountains before.”

Zidziunas said he often wondered if they were really listening through their training. He knows now that they have.

On March 5 he led a caravan of three planes on a cross-country flight out to the west coast of Florida and back. Donovan Richards and Tyson Trentham were flying a 1939 Taylorcraft BL-65 over St. Petersburg, Florida, when Richards noticed power fluctuations. He put the plane down on the 12th fairway of the St. Petersburg Country Club’s golf course.

Zidziunas showed a Google Earth map of the golf course and pointed out that “with 900 feet of total green space, Donovan safely landed in 870.” The left wing clipped a tree.

He said he was very proud the 18-year-old pilot landed without injuries in the heavily populated area.

After the landing, the plane was inspected. Zidziunas showed a photograph of sheared bolts and said, “The 76-year-old engine had its head bolted on. The failure of the head bolt caused a chain reaction failure of the surrounding bolts that caused the head to nearly blow off.”

The Taylorcraft is now being repaired by members of the Lakeland Aero Club.

Lakeland Aero Club’s Piper Cub named Aunt Betty (N32721) awaits the move into the new hangar.

Lakeland Aero Club’s Piper Cub named Aunt Betty (N32721) awaits the move into the new hangar.

One of the club’s Piper Cubs (N32721) was named in honor of Zidziunas’s Aunt Betty. In 1946 at age 19, Aunt Betty learned to fly when women were discouraged from pursuing such activities. Zidziunas was 8 years old and his aunt inspired him to love aviation. Betty later married her flight instructor.

The club members registered the plane under the N-number of Aunt Betty’s favorite plane, her Piper Cub. They also painted AUNT BETTY on the fuselage.

Recently, a taxiway was built over the drainage ditch that runs between the 2,800-foot grass runway known as Paradise Field and the club’s new hangar. Paradise Field will be the primary landing strip for the club. Paradise Field is the runway used during SUN ‘n FUN for light sport and ultralight aircraft. It is located south of the end of runway 5.

Lakeland Aero Club’s Remos G3600 light sport aircraft (N85092) sat in a loaner hangar until the club’s hangar opened.

Lakeland Aero Club’s Remos G3600 light sport aircraft (N85092) sat in a loaner hangar until the club’s hangar opened.

The long-term plans are for the club to become a legacy club. The earliest members of the club are beginning to age out, Zidziunas noted. He added that past club members will always be welcome and “after age 25, they become mentor members.”

 

Source: http://generalaviationnews.comLargest high school flying club opens new hangar

FAA Releases Drone Registration Location Data

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) today posted a large database showing the city, state and zip code of each registered drone owner. Release of the database responds to a number of Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests submitted since the new unmanned aircraft registration system began operating on December 21, 2015.

The FAA is not posting the names and street addresses of registered owners because the data is exempt from disclosure under a FOIA exemption that protects information in agency files from a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy.

The FAA based its determination to post only city, state and zip code on several factors, including, in part, that many of the registrants are minors and only hobbyists or recreational users. In addition, when the FAA published its Federal Register notice pertaining to the new unmanned aircraft registration system it specifically advised the public that name and addresses would only be available by the registration number issued to the registrant. For these reasons, the FAA believes the privacy interest in such data outweighs any public interest.

Anyone who owns a drone weighing more than 0.55 lbs. but less than 55 lbs. must register before flying the aircraft outdoors for hobby or recreation. All owners of small unmanned aircraft used for other purposes must also register as one of the requirements associated with a Section 333 exemption.

You can view and search the registration data at: http://www.faa.gov/foia/electronic_reading_room/media/Reg-by-City-State-Zip-12May2016.xlsx

Source: FAAFAA Releases Drone Registration Location Data