FAA Establishes Drone Restrictions Over Federal Prison

At the request of Federal security partners, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has been using its existing authority under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) 99.7Special Security Instructionsto address concerns about drone operations over national security sensitive facilities by establishing temporary Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) specific flight restrictions.

In cooperation with Department of Justice (DOJ), the FAA is establishing an additional restriction on drone flights up to 400 feet within the lateral boundaries of the following federal facility:

  • Administrative United States Penitentiary Thomson near Clinton, IL

Information on the FAA Notice to Airmen (NOTAM), which defines these restrictions, and all of the currently covered DOJ locations, can be found by clicking here.To ensure the public is aware of these restricted locations, this FAA website also provides an interactive map, downloadable geospatial data, and other important details. A link to these restrictions is also included in the FAAs B4UFLY mobile app.

Additional, broader information regarding flying drones in the National Airspace System, including frequently asked questions, is available on the FAAs UAS website.

These changes, which have been highlighted by FAA NOTAM FDC 8/8243, are pending until they become effective on July 7, 2018. Note that there are only a few exceptions that permit drone flights within this restriction, and they must be coordinated with the individual facility and/or the FAA.

FDC 8/8243 FDC SECURITY SPECIAL SECURITY INSTRUCTIONS (SSI)
PERTAINING TO UNMANNED ACFT SYSTEM (UAS) OPS OVER MULTIPLE LOCATIONS NATIONWIDE. THIS NOTAM SUPPLEMENTS FDC 7/7282, AND DESCRIBES THE CHANGES MADE TO THE UAS-SPECIFIC SSI AIRSPACE DEFINED BY FDC 7/7282 AND IMPLEMENTED PURSUANT TO 14 C.F.R. 99.7 FOR NATIONAL SECURITY SENSITIVE LOCATIONS. THESE CHANGES INCLUDE AN ADDITIONAL LOCATION REQUESTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE. THE UPDATED LIST OF AFFECTED AIRSPACE AND ASSOCIATED PROTECTED LOCATIONS, AND OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION ARE PROVIDED AT THE FOLLOWING FAA WEBSITE: HTTP://UAS.FAA.OPENDATA.ARCGIS.COM.

SEE FDC 7/7282 FOR COMPLETE INFORMATION ON THESE SPECIAL SECURITY INSTRUCTIONS.

1806220400-1807060359

Operators who violate the flight restriction may be subject to enforcement action, including potential civil penalties and criminal charges.

The FAA is continuing to consider additional requests by eligible federal security agencies for UAS-specific flight restrictions using the Agencys 99.7 authority as they are received. Additional changes to these restrictions will be announced by the FAA as appropriate.

Source: FAAFAA Establishes Drone Restrictions Over Federal Prison

FAA Commissions New Tower at Sarasota Airport

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) cut over to a new air traffic control tower at Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport early this morning. The new, 128 foot-tall tower will enable air traffic controllers to continue to provide the safest, most efficient service to flights at the busy Florida airport.

Air traffic controllers working in the 525 square-foot tower cab control flights up to 4,000 feet in altitude within a five-mile radius of SRQ; from five to 10 miles from the airport, they handle flights from 1,200 to 4,000 feet in altitude.

A total of 34 FAA employees work at the new facility, 20 in air traffic and 14 in technical operations, which maintains the FAA electronics equipment in the tower and on the airfield.

The FAA and the Sarasota Manatee Airport Authority (SMAA) built the new tower under a unique agreement. The FAA funded the new tower design, engineering and electronic equipment. Agency technicians and engineers installed the electronics and will maintain the equipment. SMAA funded, constructed and owns the new tower. SMAA will maintain the facility, which includes a 9,000 square foot base building that houses equipment, administrative offices and training rooms.

The FAA and SMAA officially will dedicate the new facility in mid-September.

Source: FAAFAA Commissions New Tower at Sarasota Airport

RTCA President and NextGen pioneer announces retirement

After logging nearly 10 years in the aviation standards business, Margaret Jenny, president of RTCA, announced her pending retirement in August. RTCA was founded in 1935 as the Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics. According to RTCA’s website, the private not-for-profit corporation advises the FAA and has helped provide “the foundation for virtually every modern technical advance in aviation.”

Source: aopaRTCA President and NextGen pioneer announces retirement

FAA-EC Pact Paves the Way for Lower Costs for U.S. Manufacturers.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the European Commission (EC) have signed a decision that will pave the way to lower fees that the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) charges U.S. manufacturers to validate their design approvals.

The agreementcalled Bilateral Oversight Board Decision 0008 (BOB 0008)was formalized at the 17th Annual FAA-EASA International Safety Conference in Washington, DC.

The FAA and EASA have previously signed revisions to the Technical Implementation Procedures (TIP) to the U.S.-EU Aviation Safety Agreement that reduce the time and effort to validate design approvals. Following verification and confirmation, BOB 0008 allows further recognition of the reduced involvement of the validating authority and opens the door for lower fees charged by EASA. The agencies will also be able to approve basic aircraft type certifications with minimal scrutiny.

BOB8 is a further recognition that both the FAA and EASA fully subscribe to the philosophy that safety in todays global aviation market depends to a great extent on international partnerships between aviation regulators.

The FAA and EASA also expect to sign an update to the Validation Improvement Roadmap at the FAA-EASA Safety Conference. The roadmap helps guide further streamlining of validation approvals by allowing each side to optimize reliance on the others certification system and eliminate or reduce technical involvement.

Source: FAAFAA-EC Pact Paves the Way for Lower Costs for U.S. Manufacturers.