Missing Flight MH370 Motivates New Satellite System To Allow Real-Time Tracking Of Commercial Aircraft

A decision at a United Nations conference in Geneva earlier this week will enable real-time tracking of commercial aircraft anywhere in the world … flight tracking,” the organization’s secretary general, Houlin Zhao, said, in a statement.
Source: bingMissing Flight MH370 Motivates New Satellite System To Allow Real-Time Tracking Of Commercial Aircraft

Sporty’s Academy recognized for flight training excellence

2015 FTAWARDS_HR-outlinesFor the third consecutive year, Sporty’s Academy has been recognized for its high standard of accomplishment in flight training by The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA), the world’s largest aviation association. Sporty’s Academy has been awarded a spot on the Flight Training Excellence Awards Honor Roll, a title given to high scoring flight schools from AOPA’s annual flight training poll.

AOPA’s Flight Training Excellence Awards were created to highlight the best flight training the industry has to offer.  The 2015 awards were drawn from flight students and pilots who voluntarily reviewed their flight training experience last summer through an AOPA online poll. The process yielded an evaluation of 788 different flight schools and 1,533 individual flight instructors.

Sporty’s Academy wishes to thank its clients for their confidence and support and looks forward to a continued commitment to an exceptional flight training experience.

Source: SportysSporty’s Academy recognized for flight training excellence

Pictures of the day: Rare nose art exhibit travels to EAA AirVenture museum

"Sack Time" nose art that is part of the Commemorative Air Force colelction currently on display at the EAA AirVenture Museum. (EAA photo/Brady Lane)

EAA AVIATION CENTER, OSHKOSH, Wisconsin — More than 30 pieces of nose art from World War II combat aircraft are making their first-ever trip outside their home museum, with the Experimental Aircraft Association AirVenture Museum in Oshkosh chosen as the first public display location for this rare collection.

The collection from the Commemorative Air Force (CAF) headquarters in Dallas, Texas, made its debut in time for Veterans Day after a month of preparation in the EAA museum’s Eagle Hangar, which honors the people and aircraft of World War II.

"Sack Time" nose art that is part of the Commemorative Air Force colelction currently on display at the EAA AirVenture Museum. (EAA photo/Brady Lane)

“Sack Time” nose art that is part of the Commemorative Air Force colelction currently on display at the EAA AirVenture Museum. (EAA photo/Brady Lane)

The artifacts have been designated by the National Trust for Historical Preservation as an official project of Save America’s Treasures, which seeks to preserve historic structures, art and published works throughout the nation. It will be on display at EAA throughout 2016.

The nose art titled "Mutz," the nickname of the girlfriend of the airplane's pilot, is taken from a World War II B-17 bomber. (EAA photo/Jason Toney).

The nose art titled “Mutz,” the nickname of the girlfriend of the airplane’s pilot, is taken from a World War II B-17 bomber. (EAA photo/Jason Toney).

“This collection is simply incredible; there’s no other way to put it,” said Bob Campbell, director of the EAA AirVenture Museum. “We’re honored to be the first museum chosen by the CAF to receive this priceless collection on loan. It tells a unique story of the common soldier and airman during World War II, how this artwork was created, what it meant to these young men mostly between 18 and 25 years old, and the individual tales of these aircraft that returned along with those that didn’t.”

"Night Mission" is one of the more than 30 pieces of WWII nose art from the Commemorative Air Force now on display at the EAA AirVenture Museum in Oshkosh (EAA photo/Jason Toney).

“Night Mission” is one of the more than 30 pieces of WWII nose art from the Commemorative Air Force now on display at the EAA AirVenture Museum in Oshkosh (EAA photo/Jason Toney).

The nose art was common on the bombers and fighter aircraft of the era, and displayed the creativity of crews at air bases around the world. As was the custom during World War II, some of the nose art depicts slogans or places, but many of them included drawings of young women in poses from chaste to extremely provocative. Some of the most risqué art has been moved to the Eagle Hangar’s “Top Secret” area, which also includes a surplus atomic bomb casing from the end of the war.

Each piece of artwork in the collection, which arrived in six semi-trailers in late September, includes an interpretive panel that describes the aircraft from which the artwork came, its history and any back-story details.

A sample of the Commemorative Air Force nose art exhibit on display at the EAA AirVenture Museum in Oshkosh through 2016. (EAA photo/Jason Toney)

A sample of the Commemorative Air Force nose art exhibit on display at the EAA AirVenture Museum in Oshkosh through 2016. (EAA photo/Jason Toney)

“It’s difficult to put into total context today what pressure and danger the Allied crews faced during the war, but this nose art was deemed by commanders as an important part of the morale for these units,” said Keegan Chetwynd, CAF museum curator. “When we began the plan for our new National Airbase in Dallas, we didn’t want these artifacts simply stored away in a warehouse, because it’s important that their stories be told. EAA and its museum was the first place that we believed would display this art with the respect and context that it truly deserves.”

EAA plans several events throughout the coming year that will feature the nose art collection and tell more of the background behind each piece.

Source: http://generalaviationnews.comPictures of the day: Rare nose art exhibit travels to EAA AirVenture museum

Clique me

Seaplane courtesy SPA

This past Friday I enjoyed the company of nearly a hundred close friends, most of whom I’d never met before.

The event that brought us together at Gilbert Field (KGIF) in Winter Haven, Florida, was the annual meeting of the Seaplane Pilots Association. Members gather for this once-a-year event, arriving by land, sea, and air. I have to admit, I made my way to the meeting on a motorcycle, but only because I live within spitting distance of the field. Given the opportunity, I’d have flown in, as so many did.

Every time I attend one of these events I see familiar faces. But I also meet people I’ve never crossed paths with before. It makes no difference, really. Regardless of whether we’re old buddies or total strangers, as soon as we sit down, or saunter over to a shady spot, or gather by the BBQ buffet, we become instant friends. Our common interest unites us. It’s an amazing thing to experience.

My seaplane flying pals and I are in a clique, you see. That’s not to say we exclude outsiders from our ranks. Quite the contrary. We’re happy to welcome others into our ever-growing tent. In fact, we encourage them to come.

We enjoy meeting the new arrivals — so much so that we go out of our way to make events like the one I just attended easily accessible to the general public, and other aviation enthusiasts, whether they’re seaplane rated or not.

Seaplane courtesy SPA

Photo courtesy SPA

Cliques are a natural social development that seem to be programmed into our DNA. From early childhood we have a tendency to seek out people we perceive to be like us, or at least who seem to enjoy the same activities we do.

In high school the cliques broke down into classifications like the greasers, the theater geeks, the jocks, the rich kids, the hot girls, the math team and, of course, band kids.

And while cliques get a bad name in the movies, one could make the argument that being accepted into a clique is of great social benefit to an adolescent who lacks the experience, self-confidence, or expertise in the vague life skills of social interaction that might allow them to develop more fully, more quickly.

The downside of cliques is the tendency some have to be exclusive. That’s bad. It’s also unnecessary and generally counter to the best interests of the members of the clique. Social interaction is good. Networking is good. Education, mutual support, and mentoring is good. All are available in some form to members of a clique.

That being the case, the bigger the population of the group, the more opportunity available to each member of that group. Grow clique, grow.

The Seaplane Pilots Association is, absolutely, a clique. A great one, too. Because, like most of us who engage in aeronautical activities, the members often find themselves in the minority when they’re away from their base of operations. Even within the aviation world, seaplane pilots and enthusiasts are a thin pie-slice of the overall pilot population. Yet when they band together they have increased power, greater influence, and something we in the seaplane community like to call fun.

On the advocacy side, organizations like the SPA get things done. They stand up for the little guy. And in case you’ve got any question as to who the little guy is it’s you. It’s me. It’s everyone you know.

Individually, we can be ignored, yet collectively, we represent a voting block. We become an economic powerhouse. We can sway politicians and policy in ways the individual would find difficult, if not impossible. We can make a difference.

On the community side, we have the ability to grow our population and support the activities we love through collaborative efforts. For instance, the SPA currently provides as many as a dozen full scholarships for seaplane add-on ratings each year. It has plans to increase that number, eventually doubling its available scholarships. That matters because it provides incentive, support, and real opportunity to young pilots while removing a financial obstacle that, for some, is insurmountable.

Yeah, I’m in a clique. I’m cliquey. And I like it. But the Seaplane Pilots Association isn’t the only clique I belong to, nor is there any rule that requires me or you to be religiously loyal to a particular group to the exclusion of all others.

Nope. I’ve got membership cards from multiple organizations in my wallet. I’m also a casual participant in a wide variety of groups, many of which have no formal name or organizational structure. I’ll bet you can say the same thing. So let’s say it. Let’s live the lifestyle openly, honestly, and with a big welcoming smile.

The more we participate, the more available participation is for others. As ironic as that may seem, it’s true. It’s as true for aviation as it is for a stadium full of football fans.

So go to the airport and bring someone with you when you do it. You don’t have to fly, but you certainly are free to do so if you wish. Have breakfast or lunch. Grab a cup of coffee and watch the traffic buzz overhead while aircraft move about the ramp.

Show your enthusiasm. It’s contagious you know. “The more the merrier,” isn’t just an expression. It’s a description of the dynamics of human interaction.

If you show yourself to be having fun, others will be more inclined to join you. As the crowd grows, the merriment increases. The activity becomes more acceptable.

So get cliquey. It works, and it’s kind of fun once you get the hang of it.

Source: http://generalaviationnews.comClique me

iPad Pro now available for sale

ipad pro for sale 2

The iPad Pro features a high resolution 12.9" screen.

The iPad Pro features a high resolution 12.9″ screen.

Apple’s new iPad Pro went on sale this morning, available for order from the Apple online store or through its retail app. Orders placed this morning are scheduled to arrive this Friday, November 13. You’ll also be able to buy one in person at Apple’s retail store on Friday as well.

The all new iPad Pro features a large 12.9″ screen and is primarily targeted towards students, creative professionals and those that prefer an iPad for daily use instead of a laptop. The screen has a high-resolution 2,732 x 2,048 pixel display, and the larger allows the on-screen keyboard to be presented at a size comparable to what you’d find on a similar sized 13″ laptop.

The iPad Pro features both a front and rear facing camera, and 4 speakers located on both the top and bottom of the tablet (2 more than the iPad Air). It incorporates a brand new A9X processor that Apple claims to be better performing than 80% of the portable PCs sold in the last year. Battery life is advertised to be the same as existing iPads at 10 hours, but the weight comes in at only 1.57 lbs–just a hair more than the original iPad weighed when it was launched in 2010. It’s also remarkably thin for the large size, coming in at 6.9mm, compared to 6.1mm for the iPad Air 2.

Like the iPad Air 2, it supports the new iOS 9 split-screen feature, making it a great display for running two apps side by side. It also includes a built-in barometer and anti-reflective screen coating, which we’ve found to be a real improvement over the traditional glossy iPad screen.

A stylus is available as an accessory to help with note-taking and drawing.

A stylus is available as an accessory to help with note-taking and drawing.

To add additional capability you can add Apple’s smart keyboard accessory (picture a Microsoft Surface cover) for a better typing experience. A stylus is also available as an option, called Pencil, that is sensitive to both tilt and pressure to enable realistic note-taking and drawing on the tablet.

There are 3 iPad Pro models to choose from, starting with the 32GB WiFi-only model selling for $799 and $949 for 128GB. A 128GB Wi-Fi+Cellular model is available for $1,079, which also includes an internal GPS. The smart keyboard cover will retail for $169 and the Pencil stylus goes for $99.

The iPad Pro will be a tight fit in most cockpits, though some may want to make use of the the larger size to run 2 apps simultaneously with the iOS 9 split-screen multitasking feature. We can also see some value in using the iPad Pro as large panel-mount display for experimental airplanes, since it would be able to dedicate plenty of real estate to both flight instruments and a GPS moving map.

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Source: Ipad appsiPad Pro now available for sale

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