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Scholarship recipients revealed

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The National Air Transportation Foundation (NATF) has revealed the winners of the Dan L. Meisinger Sr. Memorial Learn to Fly Scholarship and Pioneers of Flight Scholarship.NATF annually awards academic and flight training scholarships to assist outstanding candidates in the pursuit of careers in aviation service businesses.

Matthew Bettmeng, a student at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University in Prescott, Arizona, is the recipient of the 2015 Dan L. Meisinger Sr. Memorial Learn to Fly Scholarship. Matthew aspires to be a pilot who serves others by flying in the field of medical transport services.

Brett Bentley, a student at Westminster College in Salt Lake City, Utah, is one of two recipients of the 2015 Pioneers of Flight Scholarship. Brett’s aviation goals include becoming a flight instructor and continuing his flying career as an Alaskan bush pilot. Brett is currently an instrument rated private pilot studying to complete his commercial license in the spring of 2016.

Johnathon Hagen, a student at Kansas State University in Salina, Kansas, is the other recipient of the 2015 Pioneers of Flight Scholarship. Johnathon’s long-term plan is to start his own flight school or charter company. In the meantime, he will continue his education to receive his commercial pilot’s license, intern with Textron Aviation in the summer of 2016 and hopes to stay with the company ultimately as a test pilot.

Source: http://generalaviationnews.comScholarship recipients revealed

Solar Impulse Ready To Resume Around-The-World Flight

Team Has Re-Entered ‘Mission Mode’ And Is Looking For A Weather Window Swiss pioneers Bertrand Piccard and André Borschberg are ready to resume their attempt to achieve the first ever Round-The-World Solar Flight with Solar Impulse 2 (Si2) – the first solar airplane capable of flying day and night using only solar energy. After replacing overheated batteries and running maintenance flights, the team is now re-entering “mission mode”, and are now working to identify the first favorable window for Bertrand Piccard to fly toward North America, despite the current difficult weather conditions.
Source: aero newsSolar Impulse Ready To Resume Around-The-World Flight

Obama Administration Chides Senate Over FAA Bill

OMB Says 18 Months Is Not ‘Long-Term’ Funding The Obama Administration Office of Management and Budget has sent a letter to Senators John Thune (R-ND) and Bill Nelson (D-FL) … the Chairman and Ranking Democrat on the Senate Commerce Committee, saying that the FAA Reauthorization Bill currently under consideration in the U.S. Senate has some areas that need to be improved.
Source: aero newsObama Administration Chides Senate Over FAA Bill

FAA Issues New Flight Simulator Regulations

Designed To Make Simulator Training More Accurate And Realistic In Certain Scenarios Since the 1970s, the FAA has gradually expanded the permitted use of flight simulation for training. Two new agency rules dealing with simulators and aviation training devices will improve airline pilots’ response to a number of unusual situations they may encounter, and give pilots more credit toward the requirements for an instrument rating.
Source: aero newsFAA Issues New Flight Simulator Regulations

Competition On For Reusable Unmanned Spaceplane Design

Three aerospace teams will compete for a military contract to further develop their ideas for a reusable unmanned spaceplane that can make daily flights over a ten-day period. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency announced this week it will hear proposals in person on April 29 for its second and third phases of its XS-1 booster vehicle program.
Source: avwebCompetition On For Reusable Unmanned Spaceplane Design

Don’t let your iPad overheat – and crash

overheat

Your iPad will display this message and stop functioning if the internal temperature gets too warm.
Your iPad will display this message and stop functioning if the internal temperature gets too warm.

We love the iPad because it’s probably the most versatile gadget we own. And for many, it has become a required item for every flight. After flying with the iPad for more than six years, we’ve also learned that it’s also extremely reliable, provided you follow a few important preflight steps. Ultimately, as long as you have a fully-charged battery and current charts downloaded in your app, the odds of the iPad failing in flight is extremely low. There is one thing though that will get your every time if you’re not careful, and that’s the potential for overheating.

Apple lists the normal temperature operating range for the iPad as 32° – 95° F. While using the device below the freezing point may cause the screen to lag a bit, it will still function. However, if you’re using the iPad at the other temperature extreme, it will eventually resort to a thermal protection mode and become completely unusable until the internal temperature of the device is reduced. The primary reason for this is to protect the internal lithium-polymer battery (bad things can happen if they get too hot).

There are a couple of ways on a typical flight that this can happen and both will catch you off guard if you’re not paying attention. The first scenario can happen when you’re flying in a low-wing airplane en route at altitude with the iPad secured in a kneeboard on your lap. You’re in VFR conditions in sunny weather, but the iPad is out of direct sunlight. Then you make a turn over a waypoint, and the sun begins to shine directly on your iPad’s dark screen without you noticing. Even though the ambient temperature may be well below the 95° F limit, the iPad’s internal temperature will quickly elevate and soon display the overheat warning.

The other likely scenario in which your iPad can unexpectedly overheat is after shutting the engine down on the ramp on a hot summer day. Prior to the iPad, many pilots would throw their paper charts or kneeboard on the glareshield to get them out of the way. New iPad useres might inadvertently do the same thing out of habit. As we all know, the temperature inside the cabin will quickly rise after you shut the door, again putting the iPad in a vulnerable state for potential overheating. Make it a habit to take your iPad with you after shutdown, or store it in a protected part of the airplane to ensure a timely departure when you return to the airplane.

Your iPad becomes completely unusable when it overheats and will display a temperature warning on the screen. At this point, your only option is to get it to a cooler environment and lower the internal temperature. Remove it from direct sunlight and aim a few air vents over if possible. If you had it in a kneeboard or case, remove these to aid the cooling process. Once the iPad’s temperature lowers it will automatically switch back on–there’s nothing else for you to do at that point, except to keep it out of the sun.

If you fly an airplane that has large windows and lets in a good deal of sunlight to the cabin, your best bet is to consider a yoke or suction cup RAM mount. These provide plenty of flexibility to pivot the iPad screen away from direct sunlight, and expose more of the front and rear surfaces of the iPad to ambient air for continuous cooling.

 

Source: Ipad appsDon’t let your iPad overheat – and crash

Don’t let your iPad overheat – and crash

overheat

Your iPad will display this message and stop functioning if the internal temperature gets too warm.
Your iPad will display this message and stop functioning if the internal temperature gets too warm.

We love the iPad because it’s probably the most versatile gadget we own. And for many, it has become a required item for every flight. After flying with the iPad for more than six years, we’ve also learned that it’s also extremely reliable, provided you follow a few important preflight steps. Ultimately, as long as you have a fully-charged battery and current charts downloaded in your app, the odds of the iPad failing in flight is extremely low. There is one thing though that will get your every time if you’re not careful, and that’s the potential for overheating.

Apple lists the normal temperature operating range for the iPad as 32° – 95° F. While using the device below the freezing point may cause the screen to lag a bit, it will still function. However, if you’re using the iPad at the other temperature extreme, it will eventually resort to a thermal protection mode and become completely unusable until the internal temperature of the device is reduced. The primary reason for this is to protect the internal lithium-polymer battery (bad things can happen if they get too hot).

There are a couple of ways on a typical flight that this can happen and both will catch you off guard if you’re not paying attention. The first scenario can happen when you’re flying in a low-wing airplane en route at altitude with the iPad secured in a kneeboard on your lap. You’re in VFR conditions in sunny weather, but the iPad is out of direct sunlight. Then you make a turn over a waypoint, and the sun begins to shine directly on your iPad’s dark screen without you noticing. Even though the ambient temperature may be well below the 95° F limit, the iPad’s internal temperature will quickly elevate and soon display the overheat warning.

The other likely scenario in which your iPad can unexpectedly overheat is after shutting the engine down on the ramp on a hot summer day. Prior to the iPad, many pilots would throw their paper charts or kneeboard on the glareshield to get them out of the way. New iPad useres might inadvertently do the same thing out of habit. As we all know, the temperature inside the cabin will quickly rise after you shut the door, again putting the iPad in a vulnerable state for potential overheating. Make it a habit to take your iPad with you after shutdown, or store it in a protected part of the airplane to ensure a timely departure when you return to the airplane.

Your iPad becomes completely unusable when it overheats and will display a temperature warning on the screen. At this point, your only option is to get it to a cooler environment and lower the internal temperature. Remove it from direct sunlight and aim a few air vents over if possible. If you had it in a kneeboard or case, remove these to aid the cooling process. Once the iPad’s temperature lowers it will automatically switch back on–there’s nothing else for you to do at that point, except to keep it out of the sun.

If you fly an airplane that has large windows and lets in a good deal of sunlight to the cabin, your best bet is to consider a yoke or suction cup RAM mount. These provide plenty of flexibility to pivot the iPad screen away from direct sunlight, and expose more of the front and rear surfaces of the iPad to ambient air for continuous cooling.

 

Source: Ipad appsDon’t let your iPad overheat – and crash