FAA, EASA Approve Additional Garmin G5 Electronic Flight Instrument Capabilities

Includes Installation Of The Instrument In Place Of Existing Directional Gyro Or HSI The FAA and EASA have approved additional Garmin G5 electronic flight instrument capabilities, including the installation of G5 in place of an existing directional gyro (DG) or horizontal situational indicator (HSI) in select certified fixed-wing general aviation aircraft. When paired with select VHF NAV/COMMs or GPS navigators, the G5 can be considered primary for displaying magnetic heading, VOR/LOC guidance and/or GPS course guidance, as well as distance and groundspeed.
Source: aero newsFAA, EASA Approve Additional Garmin G5 Electronic Flight Instrument Capabilities

Garmin Expands G5 Capabilities

Expanded capabilities in Garmin’s G5 electronic flight instrument system have now been approved by the FAA and EASA, the company announced on Thursday. Owners of specific fixed-wing GA aircraft now can install the G5 in place of an existing directional gyro or horizontal situation indicator, Garmin said. In some panels, when paired with select VHF Nav/Comms or GPS navigators, the G5 also can be considered as the primary instrument for displaying magnetic heading, VOR/LOC guidance and/or GPS course guidance, as well as distance and groundspeed.

Source: avwebGarmin Expands G5 Capabilities

GA Groups Protest Veteran Flight Training Caps

Eight general aviation advocacy groups signed onto a letter this week protesting a bill now in the House that would put a cap on payments to veterans in flight-training programs. Other education tracks are not subject to caps, the advocates said. “Capping funds available for flight-training degree programs virtually guarantees that veterans seeking to use their GI Bill benefits to enter the aviation industry will have insufficient funds to achieve their goals,” says the letter.

Source: avwebGA Groups Protest Veteran Flight Training Caps

Drone collisions with aircraft modeled

The results of the first study to use computer modeling to simulate midair collisions between manned and unmanned aircraft in detail strongly suggest that the danger of such real-world collisions must be taken seriously. Researchers found that the notoriously volatile lithium polymer batteries used to power most drones pose less risk of a post-impact fire than expected, but the structural damage a drone collision can create was more severe than expected.

Source: aopaDrone collisions with aircraft modeled